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The Effects of Cholecalciferol Supplementation on Vitamin D Status Among a Diverse Population of Collegiate Basketball Athletes: A Quasi-Experimental Trial

1
Department of Nutrition and Food Studies, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA
2
Frank Pettrone Center for Sports Performance, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA
3
School of Kinesiology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110, USA
4
Sport Medicine Research, Mayo Clinic Health Systems, Onalaska, WI 54650, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
?
Gallo and Jones are co-senior authors of this article.
Nutrients 2020, 12(2), 370; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020370
Received: 6 January 2020 / Revised: 26 January 2020 / Accepted: 27 January 2020 / Published: 31 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sport Nutrition for Athletes)
Vitamin D may play a role in performance and injury risk, yet the required supplementation dosage for collegiate athletes is unclear. The objective of this study was to define the dosage of vitamin D3 supplementation required to beneficially affect serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) among a sample of collegiate basketball athletes. This was a quasi-experimental trial, participants were allocated to one of three groups of vitamin D3 daily at the beginning of pre-season training and dependent upon their baseline vitamin D status as follows: insufficient (<75 nmol/L) to 10,000 IU, sufficient (75–125 nmol/L) to 5000 IU and optimal (>125 nmol/L) to no supplementation. Follow-up assessments were completed ~ 5 months later in post season. The majority (n = 13) were allocated to 10,000 IU vs. n = 5 to 5000 IU and n = 2 to no supplementation. The 10,000 IU group showed the greatest change (35.0 ± 27.0 nmol/L) vs. the 5000 IU group (−9.3 ± 9.6 nmol/L) and no supplementation group (−41.6 ± 11.7 nmol/L, p < 0.01). Only 1 participant reached optimal status in the 10,000 IU group. In conclusion, a daily dosage of 10,000 IU vitamin D3 supplementation mitigated the high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among collegiate basketball players but was insufficient for all to reach sufficient levels. View Full-Text
Keywords: vitamin D; supplementation; 25-hydroxyvitamin D; collegiate athletes; basketball; skin pigmentation vitamin D; supplementation; 25-hydroxyvitamin D; collegiate athletes; basketball; skin pigmentation
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Sekel, N.M.; Gallo, S.; Fields, J.; Jagim, A.R.; Wagner, T.; Jones, M.T. The Effects of Cholecalciferol Supplementation on Vitamin D Status Among a Diverse Population of Collegiate Basketball Athletes: A Quasi-Experimental Trial. Nutrients 2020, 12, 370.

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