Special Issue "The Role of Drug Resistance-Associated Proteins in Cancer: from Conventional Anticancer Drugs to Targeting Drugs"

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Takeo Nakanishi
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Faculty of Pharmacy, Takasaki University of Health and Welfare, 60 Nakaorui-machi, Takasaki-shi 370-0033, Japan
Interests: cancer; chemotherapy; drug-resistance; pharmacology; transporter; gene expression; pharmacokinetics; inflammation; prostaglandin
Prof. Dr. Zhe-Sheng (Jason) Chen
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, St. John's University, Queens, NY 11439, USA
Interests: Drug Resistance; ABC transporters; Cancer Chemotherapy; Natural Products; Nanomaterials
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cancer is among the leading causes of death worldwide. Despite the development of effective small molecules targeting oncogenic drivers, many patients relapse as treatment proceeds. Indeed, the failure of chemotherapy leaves resistant cancer cells to survive, eventually leading to the death of patients. Hence, drug resistance is still a major obstacle to overcome to achieve successful treatment.

Cancer cells become resistant against anti-cancer drugs due to diverse molecular mechanisms, such as heightened antiapoptotic potential, altered drug metabolisms, enhanced DNA repairs, and increased efflux and decreased uptake of drugs. Additionally, these biological events may be determined by an individual's genetic differences. In particular, the activated export of anticancer drugs by drug efflux pumps, such as P-glycoprotein, is well accepted as a universal model for multidrug resistance; however, efforts to block these pumps have not been successful thus far in clinical settings.

A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying drug resistance acquired by cancer cells will provide us with clues for novel therapeutic strategies. Emerging evidence of exosomic microRNAs that contribute to tumor microenvironments may hold much promise for new approaches in developing effective individualized therapies. This Special Issue will highlight the current state of the art in diverse molecular mechanisms of drug resistance along with novel targets and prospects for improving cancer treatment.

Dr. Takeo Nakanishi
Dr. Zhe-Sheng (Jason) Chen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.ynsqex.icu by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cancers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (15 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Preclinical Evaluation of the Novel Small-Molecule MSI-N1014 for Treating Drug-Resistant Colon Cancer via the LGR5/β-catenin/miR-142-3p Network and Reducing Cancer-Associated Fibroblast Transformation
Cancers 2020, 12(6), 1590; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12061590 - 16 Jun 2020
Abstract
Colorectal cancer represents one of the most prevalent malignancies globally, with an estimated 140,000 new cases in the United States alone in 2019. Despite advancements in interventions, drug resistance occurs in virtually all patients diagnosed with late stages of colon cancer. Amplified epidermal [...] Read more.
Colorectal cancer represents one of the most prevalent malignancies globally, with an estimated 140,000 new cases in the United States alone in 2019. Despite advancements in interventions, drug resistance occurs in virtually all patients diagnosed with late stages of colon cancer. Amplified epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling is one of the most prevalent oncogenic drivers in patients and induces increased Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transduction and activator of transcription (STAT) and β-catenin functions, all of which facilitate disease progression. Equally important, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) transformed by cancer cells within the tumor microenvironment (TME) further facilitate malignancy by secreting interleukin (IL)-6 and augmenting STAT3 signaling in colon cancer cells and promoting the generation of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs). Based on these premises, single-targeted therapeutics have proven ineffective for treating malignant colon cancer, and alternative multiple-targeting agents should be explored. Herein, we synthesized a tetracyclic heterocyclic azathioxanthone, MSI-N1014, and demonstrated its therapeutic potential both in vitro and in vivo. First, we used a co-culture system to demonstrate that colon cancer cells co-cultured with CAFs resulted in heightened 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) resistance and tumor sphere-forming ability and increased side populations, accompanied by elevated expression of cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), β-catenin, leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (LGR5), and ATP-binding cassette super-family G member 2 (ABCG2). MSI-N1014 suppressed cell viability, colony formation, and migration in both DLD1 and HCT116 cells. MSI-N1014 treatment led to decreased expressions of oncogenic markers, including mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), EGFR, and IL-6 and stemness markers such as CD44, β-catenin, and LGR5. More importantly, MSI-N1014 treatment suppressed the transformation of CAFs, and was associated with decreased secretion of IL-6 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by CAFs. Furthermore, MSI-N1014 treatment resulted in significantly reduced oncogenic properties, namely the migratory ability, tumor-sphere generation, and resistance against 5-FU. Notably, an increased level of the tumor suppressor, miR-142-3p, whose targets include LGR5, IL-6, and ABCG2, was detected in association with MSI-N1014 treatment. Finally, we demonstrated the therapeutic potential of MSI-N1014 in vivo, where combined treatment with MSI-N1014 and 5-FU led to the lowest tumor growth, followed by MSI-N1014 only, 5-FU, and the vehicle control. Tumor samples from the MSI-N1014 group showed markedly reduced expressions of LGR5, β-catenin, IL-6, and mTOR, but increased expression of the tumor suppressor, miR-142-3p, according to qRT-PCR analysis. Collectively, we present preclinical support for the application of MSI-N1014 in treating 5-FU-resistant colon cancer cells. Further investigation is warranted to translate these findings into clinical settings. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Inhibition of Patched Drug Efflux Increases Vemurafenib Effectiveness against Resistant BrafV600E Melanoma
Cancers 2020, 12(6), 1500; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12061500 - 09 Jun 2020
Abstract
Melanoma patients harboring the BRAFV600E mutation are treated with vemurafenib. Almost all of them ultimately acquire resistance, leading to disease progression. Here, we find that a small molecule from a marine sponge, panicein A hydroquinone (PAH), overcomes resistance of BRAFV600E melanoma [...] Read more.
Melanoma patients harboring the BRAFV600E mutation are treated with vemurafenib. Almost all of them ultimately acquire resistance, leading to disease progression. Here, we find that a small molecule from a marine sponge, panicein A hydroquinone (PAH), overcomes resistance of BRAFV600E melanoma cells to vemurafenib, leading to tumor elimination in corresponding human xenograft models in mice. We report the synthesis of PAH and demonstrate that this compound inhibits the drug efflux activity of the Hedgehog receptor, Patched. Our SAR study allowed identifying a key pharmacophore responsible for this activity. We showed that Patched is strongly expressed in metastatic samples from a cohort of melanoma patients and is correlated with decreased overall survival. Patched is a multidrug transporter that uses the proton motive force to efflux drugs. This makes its function specific to cancer cells, thereby avoiding toxicity issues that are commonly observed with inhibitors of ABC multidrug transporters. Our data provide strong evidence that PAH is a highly promising lead for the treatment of vemurafenib resistant BRAFV600E melanoma. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
MicroRNA Response and Toxicity of Potential Pathways in Human Colon Cancer Cells Exposed to Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles
Cancers 2020, 12(5), 1236; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12051236 - 14 May 2020
Abstract
Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) are widely used for biomedical and food applications, the toxicity of TiO2-NPs in vivo and in vitro has been elucidated, but the underlying cytotoxicity of TiO2-NPs against microRNA remains largely unknown. The purpose [...] Read more.
Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) are widely used for biomedical and food applications, the toxicity of TiO2-NPs in vivo and in vitro has been elucidated, but the underlying cytotoxicity of TiO2-NPs against microRNA remains largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to analyze microRNA profiling induced by TiO2-NPs against NCM460 and HCT116 cell lines. Comparative analysis identified 34 and 24 microRNAs were significantly altered in the TiO2-NPs treated cells at concentrations of 3 μg/mL and 30 μg/mL, respectively. Functional classification demonstrated that a large proportion of genes involved in metabolism, human disease, and environmental information process were significantly upregulated by TiO2-NPs. Bioinformatics analysis suggested that microRNA 378 might be an early indicator of cellular response to exogenous stimuli with apoptotic signals. Furthermore, TiO2-NPs significantly altered the expression of microRNA 378b and 378g in HCT116 and NCM460 cell lines at different concentrations from 3 to 6 μg/mL. These concentrations elicit high-sensitivity of stimuli response in colon cancer cells when exposed to the slight doses of TiO2-NPs. Our study indicated that microRNAs 378b and 378g may play an important role in TiO2-NPs-mediated colonic cytotoxicity, which may provide a valuable insight into the molecular mechanisms of potential risks in colitis and colon cancer. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Lipid–Saporin Nanoparticles for the Intracellular Delivery of Cytotoxic Protein to Overcome ABC Transporter-Mediated Multidrug Resistance In Vitro and In Vivo
Cancers 2020, 12(2), 498; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12020498 - 21 Feb 2020
Abstract
Although the judicious use of anticancer drugs that target one or more receptor tyrosine kinases constitutes an effective strategy to attenuate tumor growth, drug resistance is commonly encountered in cancer patients. The ATP-binding cassette transporters are one of the major contributors to the [...] Read more.
Although the judicious use of anticancer drugs that target one or more receptor tyrosine kinases constitutes an effective strategy to attenuate tumor growth, drug resistance is commonly encountered in cancer patients. The ATP-binding cassette transporters are one of the major contributors to the development of multidrug resistance as their overexpression significantly decreases the intracellular concentration and thus, the efficacy of certain anticancer drugs. Therefore, the development of treatment strategies that would not be susceptible to efflux or excretion by specific ABC transporters could overcome resistance to treatment. Here, we investigated the anticancer efficacy of saporin, a ribosome-inactivating protein. Since saporin has poor permeability across the cell membrane, it was encapsulated in a lipid-based nanoparticle system (EC16-1) that effectively delivered the formulation (EC16-1/saporin) intracellularly and produced anti-cancer efficacy. EC16-1/saporin, at nanomolar concentrations, significantly inhibited the cellular proliferation of parental and ABCB1- and ABCG2-overexpressing cancer cells. EC16-1/saporin did not significantly alter the subcellular localization of ABCB1 and ABCG2. In addition, EC16-1/saporin induced apoptosis in parental and ABCB1- and ABCG2-overexpressing cancer cells. In a murine model system, EC16-1/saporin significantly inhibited the tumor growth in mice xenografted with parental and ABCB1- and ABCG2-overexpressing cancer cells. Our findings suggest that the EC16-1/saporin combination could potentially be a novel therapeutic treatment in patients with parental or ABCB1- and ABCG2-positive drug-resistant cancers. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Venetoclax, a BCL-2 Inhibitor, Enhances the Efficacy of Chemotherapeutic Agents in Wild-Type ABCG2-Overexpression-Mediated MDR Cancer Cells
Cancers 2020, 12(2), 466; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12020466 - 18 Feb 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Previous studies have shown that small-molecule BCL-2 inhibitors can have a synergistic interaction with ABCG2 substrates in chemotherapy. Venetoclax is a potent and selective BCL-2 inhibitor, approved by the FDA in 2016 for the treatment of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). This [...] Read more.
Previous studies have shown that small-molecule BCL-2 inhibitors can have a synergistic interaction with ABCG2 substrates in chemotherapy. Venetoclax is a potent and selective BCL-2 inhibitor, approved by the FDA in 2016 for the treatment of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). This study showed that, at a non-toxic concentration, venetoclax at 10 µM significantly reversed multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by wild-type ABCG2, without significantly affecting MDR mediated by mutated ABCG2 (R482G and R482T) and ABCB1, while moderate or no reversal effects were observed at lower concentrations (0.5 to 1 µM). The results showed that venetoclax increased the intracellular accumulation of chemotherapeutic agents, which was the result of directly blocking the wild-type ABCG2 efflux function and inhibiting the ATPase activity of ABCG2. Our study demonstrated that venetoclax potentiates the efficacy of wild-type ABCG2 substrate drugs. These findings may provide useful guidance in combination therapy against wild-type ABCG2-mediated MDR cancer in clinical practice. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
ABCG2 Overexpression Contributes to Pevonedistat Resistance
Cancers 2020, 12(2), 429; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12020429 - 12 Feb 2020
Abstract
MLN4924 (pevonedistat) is a first-in-class NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE) inhibitor in clinical trials for the treatment of solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. Despite the promising activity of MLN4924 observed in early trials, drug resistance has been noted in some patients. Identifying the underlying cause [...] Read more.
MLN4924 (pevonedistat) is a first-in-class NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE) inhibitor in clinical trials for the treatment of solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. Despite the promising activity of MLN4924 observed in early trials, drug resistance has been noted in some patients. Identifying the underlying cause of treatment failure may help to better stratify patients that are most likely to benefit from this novel agent. Early preclinical studies revealed that the development of NAEβ mutations promotes resistance to MLN4924. However, these mutations have not been detected in patients that are relapsed/refractory to MLN4924, suggesting that other mechanisms are driving clinical resistance. To better understand the potential mechanisms of MLN4924 resistance, we generated MLN4924-resistant ovarian cancer cells. Interestingly, these cells did not develop mutations in NAEβ. Transcriptome analyses revealed that one of the most upregulated genes in resistant cells was ABCG2. This result was validated by quantitative real-time PCR and immunoblotting. Importantly, the sensitivity of MLN4924-resistant cells was restored by lentiviral short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting ABCG2. Further investigation using ABCG2-overexpressing NCI-H460/MX20 cells determined that these cells are resistant to the anticancer effects of MLN4924 and can be sensitized by co-treatment with the ABCG2 inhibitors YHO-13351 and fumitremorgin C. Finally, HEK293 models with overexpression of wild-type ABCG2 (R482) and variants (R482G and R482T) all demonstrated significant resistance to MLN4924 compared to wild-type cells. Overall, these findings define an important molecular resistance mechanism to MLN4924 and demonstrate that ABCG2 may be a useful clinical biomarker that predicts resistance to MLN4924 treatment. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Tivantinib, A c-Met Inhibitor in Clinical Trials, Is Susceptible to ABCG2-Mediated Drug Resistance
Cancers 2020, 12(1), 186; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12010186 - 12 Jan 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Tivantinib, also known as ARQ-197, is a potent non-ATP competitive selective c-Met inhibitor currently under phase 3 clinical trial evaluation for liver and lung cancers. In this study, we explored factors that may lead to tivantinib resistance, especially in regards to its interaction [...] Read more.
Tivantinib, also known as ARQ-197, is a potent non-ATP competitive selective c-Met inhibitor currently under phase 3 clinical trial evaluation for liver and lung cancers. In this study, we explored factors that may lead to tivantinib resistance, especially in regards to its interaction with ATP-binding cassette super-family G member 2 (ABCG2). ABCG2 is one of the most important members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, a group of membrane proteins that play a critical role in mediating multidrug resistance (MDR) in a variety of cancers, including those of the liver and lung. Tivantinib received a high score in docking analysis, indicating a strong interaction between tivantinib and ABCG2, and an ATPase assay indicated that tivantinib stimulated ABCG2 ATPase activity in a concentration-dependent manner. An MTT assay showed that ABCG2 overexpression significantly desensitized both the cancer cells and ABCG2 transfected-HEK293 cells to tivantinib and that this drug resistance can be reversed by ABCG2 inhibitors. Furthermore, tivantinib upregulated the protein expression of ABCG2 without altering the cell surface localization of ABCG2, leading to increased resistance to substrate drugs, such as mitoxantrone. Altogether, these data demonstrate that tivantinib is a substrate of ABCG2, and, therefore, ABCG2 overexpression may decrease its therapeutic effect. Our study provides evidence that the overexpression of ABCG2 should be monitored in clinical settings as an important risk factor for tivantinib drug resistance. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Ovatodiolide Suppresses Oral Cancer Malignancy by Down-Regulating Exosomal Mir-21/STAT3/β-Catenin Cargo and Preventing Oncogenic Transformation of Normal Gingival Fibroblasts
Cancers 2020, 12(1), 56; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12010056 - 24 Dec 2019
Abstract
Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is among the most commonly diagnosed malignancies in the world. Patients with OSCC often develop treatment resistance, resulting in a poor prognosis. Mounting evidence indicates that interactions between cancerous cells and other components of the tumor microenvironment (TME) [...] Read more.
Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is among the most commonly diagnosed malignancies in the world. Patients with OSCC often develop treatment resistance, resulting in a poor prognosis. Mounting evidence indicates that interactions between cancerous cells and other components of the tumor microenvironment (TME) determine their response to treatment. Herein, we examined the role of cancer stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles (CSC_EVs) generated from CAL27 and SCC-15 OSCC cells in the development of cisplatin (CDDP) resistance. We demonstrated that CSC_EVs enhance CDDP resistance, clonogenicity, and the tumorsphere formation potential of OSCC cells. Our bioinformatics analyses revealed that OSCC_EVs are enriched with microRNA (miR)-21-5p and are associated with increased metastasis, stemness, chemoresistance, and poor survival in patients with OSCC. Mechanistically, enhanced activity of CSC_EVs was positively correlated with upregulated β-catenin, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 messenger (m)RNA and protein expression levels. CSC_EVs also conferred a cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF) phenotype on normal gingival fibroblasts (NGFs), with the resultant CAFs enhancing the oncogenicity of OSCC cells. Interestingly, treatment with ovatodiolide (OV), the bioactive component of Anisomeles indica, suppressed OSCC tumorigenesis by reducing the cargo content of EVs derived from CSCs, suppressing self-renewal, and inhibiting the NGF-CAF transformation by disrupting EV-TME interactions. Moreover, by suppressing miR-21-5p, STAT3, and mTOR expressions in CSC_EVs, OV re-sensitized CSCs to CDDP and suppressed OSCC tumorigenesis. In vivo, treatment with OV alone or in combination with CDDP significantly reduced the tumor sphere-forming ability and decreased EV cargos containing mTOR, PI3K, STAT3, β-catenin, and miR-21-5p. In summary, our findings provide further strong evidence of OV’s therapeutic effect in OSCC. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Tumor Expression of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 (Cdk5) Is a Prognostic Biomarker and Predicts Outcome of Oxaliplatin-Treated Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients
Cancers 2019, 11(10), 1540; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers11101540 - 11 Oct 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
In recent years, an increasing number of studies have shown that elevated expression of cyclin dependent kinase (Cdk5) contributes to the oncogenic initiation and progression of many types of cancers. In this study, we investigated the expression pattern of Cdk5 in colorectal cancer [...] Read more.
In recent years, an increasing number of studies have shown that elevated expression of cyclin dependent kinase (Cdk5) contributes to the oncogenic initiation and progression of many types of cancers. In this study, we investigated the expression pattern of Cdk5 in colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines and in a large number of tumor samples in order to evaluate its relevance in this pathogenesis and possible use as a prognostic marker. We found that Cdk5 is highly expressed and activated in CRC cell lines and that silencing of the kinase decreases their migration ability. In tumor tissues, Cdk5 is overexpressed compared to normal tissues due to a copy number gain. In patients with localized disease, we found that high Cdk5 levels correlate with poor prognosis, while in the metastatic setting, this was only the case for patients receiving an oxaliplatin-based treatment. When exploring the Cdk5 levels in the consensus molecular subtypes (CMS), we found the lowest levels in subtype 1, where high Cdk5 again was associated with a poorer prognosis. In conclusion, we confirm that Cdk5 is involved in CRC and disease progression and that it could serve as a prognostic and predictive biomarker in this disease. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
A Novel Multi-Target Small Molecule, LCC-09, Inhibits Stemness and Therapy-Resistant Phenotypes of Glioblastoma Cells by Increasing miR-34a and Deregulating the DRD4/Akt/mTOR Signaling Axis
Cancers 2019, 11(10), 1442; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers11101442 - 26 Sep 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The management of glioblastomas (GBMs) is challenged by the development of therapeutic resistance and early disease recurrence, despite multi-modal therapy. This may be attributed to the presence of glioma stem cells (GSCs) which are known to survive radio- and chemotherapy, by circumventing death [...] Read more.
The management of glioblastomas (GBMs) is challenged by the development of therapeutic resistance and early disease recurrence, despite multi-modal therapy. This may be attributed to the presence of glioma stem cells (GSCs) which are known to survive radio- and chemotherapy, by circumventing death signals and inducing cell re-population. Recent findings suggest GSCs may be enriched by certain treatment modality. These necessitate the development of novel therapeutics capable of targeting GBM cell plasticity and therapy-resistant GSCs. Here, aided by computer-assisted structure characterization and target identification, we predicted that a novel 5-(2′,4′-difluorophenyl)-salicylanilide derivative, LCC-09, could target dopamine receptors and oncogenic markers implicated in GBMs. Bioinformatics data have indicated that dopamine receptor (DRD) 2, DRD4, CD133 and Nestin were elevated in GBM clinical samples and correlated to TMZ (Temozolomide) resistance and increased ALDH (Aldehyde dehydrogenase) activity (3.5–8.9%) as well as enhanced (2.1–2.4-fold) neurosphere formation efficiency in U87MG and D54MG GBM cell lines. In addition, TMZ-resistant GSC phenotype was associated with up-regulated DRD4, Akt, mTOR, β-catenin, CDK6, NF-κB and Erk1/2 expression. LCC-09 alone, or combined with TMZ, suppressed the tumorigenic and stemness traits of TMZ-resistant GBM cells while concomitantly down-regulating DRD4, Akt, mTOR, β-catenin, Erk1/2, NF-κB, and CDK6 expression. Notably, LCC-09-mediated anti-GBM/GSC activities were associated with the re-expression of tumor suppressor miR-34a and reversal of TMZ-resistance, in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, these data lay the foundation for further exploration of the clinical feasibility of administering LCC-09 as single-agent or combinatorial therapy for patients with TMZ-resistant GBMs. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Transport-Mediated Oxaliplatin Resistance Associated with Endogenous Overexpression of MRP2 in Caco-2 and PANC-1 Cells
Cancers 2019, 11(9), 1330; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers11091330 - 08 Sep 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Our recent publications showed that multidrug resistance protein 2 (MRP2, encoded by the ABCC2 gene) conferred oxaliplatin resistance in human liver cancer HepG2 cells. However, the contribution of MRP2 to oxaliplatin resistance remains unclear in colorectal and pancreatic cancer lines. We investigated the [...] Read more.
Our recent publications showed that multidrug resistance protein 2 (MRP2, encoded by the ABCC2 gene) conferred oxaliplatin resistance in human liver cancer HepG2 cells. However, the contribution of MRP2 to oxaliplatin resistance remains unclear in colorectal and pancreatic cancer lines. We investigated the effects of silencing MRP2 by siRNA on oxaliplatin accumulation and sensitivity in human colorectal cancer Caco-2 cells and pancreatic cancer PANC-1 cells. We characterized the effects of oxaliplatin on MRP2 ATPase activities using membrane vesicles. Over-expression of MRP2 (endogenously in Caco-2 and PANC-1 cells) was associated with decreased oxaliplatin accumulation and cytotoxicity, but those deficits were reversed by inhibition of MRP2 with myricetin or siRNA knockdown. Silencing MRP2 by siRNA increased oxaliplatin-induced apoptotic rate in Caco-2 and PANC-1 cells. Oxaliplatin stimulated MRP2 ATPase activity with a concentration needed to reach 50% of the maximal stimulation (EC50) value of 8.3 ± 0.7 µM and Hill slope 2.7. In conclusion, oxaliplatin is a substrate of MRP2 with possibly two binding sites, and silencing MRP2 increased oxaliplatin accumulation and cytotoxicity in two widely available gastrointestinal tumour lines (PANC-1 and Caco-2). Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Sorafenib Resistance in Hepatocellular Carcinoma: The Relevance of Genetic Heterogeneity
Cancers 2020, 12(6), 1576; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12061576 - 15 Jun 2020
Abstract
Despite advances in biomedicine, the incidence and the mortality of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remain high. The majority of HCC cases are diagnosed in later stages leading to the less than optimal outcome of the treatments. Molecular targeted therapy with sorafenib, a dual-target inhibitor [...] Read more.
Despite advances in biomedicine, the incidence and the mortality of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remain high. The majority of HCC cases are diagnosed in later stages leading to the less than optimal outcome of the treatments. Molecular targeted therapy with sorafenib, a dual-target inhibitor targeting the serine-threonine kinase Raf and the tyrosine kinases VEGFR/PDGFR, is at present the main treatment for advanced-stage HCC, either in a single or combinatory regimen. However, it was observed in a large number of patients that its effectiveness is hampered by drug resistance. HCC is highly heterogeneous, within the tumor and among individuals, and this influences disease progression, classification, prognosis, and naturally cellular susceptibility to drug resistance. This review aims to provide an insight on how HCC heterogeneity influences the different primary mechanisms of chemoresistance against sorafenib including reduced drug intake, enhanced drug efflux, intracellular drug metabolism, alteration of molecular targets, activation/inactivation of signaling pathways, changes in the DNA repair machinery, and negative balance between apoptosis and survival of the cancer cells. The diverse variants, mutations, and polymorphisms in molecules and their association with drug response can be a helpful tool in treatment decision making. Accordingly, the existence of heterogeneous biomarkers in the tumor must be considered to strengthen multi-target strategies in patient-tailored treatment. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Management of Drug Resistance in Mantle Cell Lymphoma
Cancers 2020, 12(6), 1565; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12061565 - 12 Jun 2020
Abstract
Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a rare but aggressive B-cell hemopathy characterized by the translocation t(11;14)(q13;q32) that leads to the overexpression of the cell cycle regulatory protein cyclin D1. This translocation is the initial event of the lymphomagenesis, but tumor cells can acquire [...] Read more.
Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a rare but aggressive B-cell hemopathy characterized by the translocation t(11;14)(q13;q32) that leads to the overexpression of the cell cycle regulatory protein cyclin D1. This translocation is the initial event of the lymphomagenesis, but tumor cells can acquire additional alterations allowing the progression of the disease with a more aggressive phenotype and a tight dependency on microenvironment signaling. To date, the chemotherapeutic-based standard care is largely inefficient and despite the recent advent of different targeted therapies including proteasome inhibitors, immunomodulatory drugs, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, relapses are frequent and are generally related to a dismal prognosis. As a result, MCL remains an incurable disease. In this review, we will present the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance learned from both preclinical and clinical experiences in MCL, detailing the main tumor intrinsic processes and signaling pathways associated to therapeutic drug escape. We will also discuss the possibility to counteract the acquisition of drug refractoriness through the design of more efficient strategies, with an emphasis on the most recent combination approaches. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Secondary Resistant Mutations to Small Molecule Inhibitors in Cancer Cells
Cancers 2020, 12(4), 927; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12040927 - 09 Apr 2020
Abstract
Secondary resistant mutations in cancer cells arise in response to certain small molecule inhibitors. These mutations inevitably cause recurrence and often progression to a more aggressive form. Resistant mutations may manifest in various forms. For example, some mutations decrease or abrogate the affinity [...] Read more.
Secondary resistant mutations in cancer cells arise in response to certain small molecule inhibitors. These mutations inevitably cause recurrence and often progression to a more aggressive form. Resistant mutations may manifest in various forms. For example, some mutations decrease or abrogate the affinity of the drug for the protein. Others restore the function of the enzyme even in the presence of the inhibitor. In some cases, resistance is acquired through activation of a parallel pathway which bypasses the function of the drug targeted pathway. The Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) produced a compendium of resistant mutations to small molecule inhibitors reported in the literature. Here, we build on these data and provide a comprehensive review of resistant mutations in cancers. We also discuss mechanistic parallels of resistance. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Roles of Sorcin in Drug Resistance in Cancer: One Protein, Many Mechanisms, for a Novel Potential Anticancer Drug Target
Cancers 2020, 12(4), 887; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers12040887 - 06 Apr 2020
Abstract
The development of drug resistance is one of the main causes of failure in anti-cancer treatments. Tumor cells adopt many strategies to counteract the action of chemotherapeutic agents, e.g., enhanced DNA damage repair, inactivation of apoptotic pathways, alteration of drug targets, drug inactivation, [...] Read more.
The development of drug resistance is one of the main causes of failure in anti-cancer treatments. Tumor cells adopt many strategies to counteract the action of chemotherapeutic agents, e.g., enhanced DNA damage repair, inactivation of apoptotic pathways, alteration of drug targets, drug inactivation, and overexpression of ABC (Adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette, or ATP-binding cassette) transporters. These are broad substrate-specificity ATP-dependent efflux pumps able to export toxins or drugs out of cells; for instance, ABCB1 (MDR1, or P-glycoprotein 1), overexpressed in most cancer cells, confers them multidrug resistance (MDR). The gene coding for sorcin (SOluble Resistance-related Calcium-binding proteIN) is highly conserved among mammals and is located in the same chromosomal locus and amplicon as the ABC transporters ABCB1 and ABCB4, both in human and rodent genomes (two variants of ABCB1, i.e., ABCB1a and ABCB1b, are in rodent amplicon). Sorcin was initially characterized as a soluble protein overexpressed in multidrug (MD) resistant cells and named “resistance-related” because of its co-amplification with ABCB1. Although for years sorcin overexpression was thought to be only a by-product of the co-amplification with ABC transporter genes, many papers have recently demonstrated that sorcin plays an important part in MDR, indicating a possible role of sorcin as an oncoprotein. The present review illustrates sorcin roles in the generation of MDR via many mechanisms and points to sorcin as a novel potential target of different anticancer molecules. Full article
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