Special Issue "Sport Nutrition for Athletes"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Sports Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Marco Malaguti
Website
Guest Editor
Department for Life Quality Studies, Alma Mater Studiorum-University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy
Interests: biochemistry of nutrition; nutraceuticals; dietary supplements; sport science; nutrition for health
Dr. Antonello Lorenzini
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences, Alma Mater Studiorum—University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy
Interests: biology of aging; biology of longevity; biochemistry of nutrition; health promotion; sport nutrition

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nutrition represents, together with training and genetic background, a key factor leading to top performance since it provides energy, influences muscle adaptation to training, and improves cognitive functions and resistance to fatigue. In addition to this well-known concept, athlete nutrition is also related to athlete health. Presently, an increasing number of elderly athletes compete with excellent results in numerous sporting events, suggesting that proper training and proper nutrition can extend the span of “sport longevity”. Athletes are now a population that includes people of different age groups, from teenagers to the elderly, different genders, without or with chronic diseases (e.g., diabetes) or disabilities (Paralympic athletes), all of them with specific nutritional needs. Additionally, different cultural and regional habits and religion-related traditions may affect athlete nutritional needs.  

As such, this Special Issue seeks submissions of manuscripts, either describing original research or reviews with a focus on dietary patterns and/specific nutrient/nutraceutical and supplements for athletes.

Nutrients welcomes also the submissions of work on cell cultures and/or animal models if this work may have a direct implication to human nutrition.

Dr. Marco Malaguti
Dr. Antonello Lorenzini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.ynsqex.icu by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sport nutrition
  • Sport supplements
  • Athletes
  • Paralympic athletes
  • Young athletes
  • Elderly athletes
  • Exercise

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Quercetin Treatment on Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Exercise-Induced AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Activation in Rat Skeletal Muscle
Nutrients 2020, 12(3), 729; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030729 - 10 Mar 2020
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of chronic quercetin treatment on mitochondrial biogenesis, endurance exercise performance and activation levels of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in rat skeletal muscle. Rats were assigned to a control or quercetin group and were [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of chronic quercetin treatment on mitochondrial biogenesis, endurance exercise performance and activation levels of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in rat skeletal muscle. Rats were assigned to a control or quercetin group and were fed for 7 days. Rats treated with quercetin showed no changes in the protein levels of citrate synthase or cytochrome C oxidase IV or those of sirtuin 1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α or phosphorylated AMPK. After endurance swimming exercise, quercetin-treated rats demonstrated no differences in blood and muscle lactate levels or glycogen utilization speed compared to control rats. These results indicate that quercetin treatment does not stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle and does not influence metabolism in a way that might enhance endurance exercise capacity. On the other hand, the AMPK phosphorylation level immediately after exercise was significantly lower in quercetin-treated muscles, suggesting that quercetin treatment might provide a disadvantage to muscle adaptation when administered with exercise training. The molecular results of this study indicate that quercetin treatment may not be advantageous for improving endurance exercise performance, at least after high-dose and short-term therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sport Nutrition for Athletes)
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The Effects of Cholecalciferol Supplementation on Vitamin D Status Among a Diverse Population of Collegiate Basketball Athletes: A Quasi-Experimental Trial
Nutrients 2020, 12(2), 370; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12020370 - 31 Jan 2020
Abstract
Vitamin D may play a role in performance and injury risk, yet the required supplementation dosage for collegiate athletes is unclear. The objective of this study was to define the dosage of vitamin D3 supplementation required to beneficially affect serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [...] Read more.
Vitamin D may play a role in performance and injury risk, yet the required supplementation dosage for collegiate athletes is unclear. The objective of this study was to define the dosage of vitamin D3 supplementation required to beneficially affect serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) among a sample of collegiate basketball athletes. This was a quasi-experimental trial, participants were allocated to one of three groups of vitamin D3 daily at the beginning of pre-season training and dependent upon their baseline vitamin D status as follows: insufficient (<75 nmol/L) to 10,000 IU, sufficient (75–125 nmol/L) to 5000 IU and optimal (>125 nmol/L) to no supplementation. Follow-up assessments were completed ~ 5 months later in post season. The majority (n = 13) were allocated to 10,000 IU vs. n = 5 to 5000 IU and n = 2 to no supplementation. The 10,000 IU group showed the greatest change (35.0 ± 27.0 nmol/L) vs. the 5000 IU group (−9.3 ± 9.6 nmol/L) and no supplementation group (−41.6 ± 11.7 nmol/L, p < 0.01). Only 1 participant reached optimal status in the 10,000 IU group. In conclusion, a daily dosage of 10,000 IU vitamin D3 supplementation mitigated the high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency among collegiate basketball players but was insufficient for all to reach sufficient levels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sport Nutrition for Athletes)
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